Construction News

I Build NH connects NH solar company with subsidized training program to find their next successful apprentice

By I Build NH | February 8, 2022

Written by Samantha Farrow, Freelance Writer

ReVision Energy, a Brentwood based employee owned solar company, planned to expand and recruit for apprenticeship positions. Alyssa Thomas, a single mother in addiction recovery with construction experience, enrolled in the NH Employment Program’s (NHEP) On the Job  Training (OJT) program seeking a career. I Build NH reached out to ReVision to introduce  Thomas and as they say, the rest was history.

“We saw Alyssa’s resume come through. We always love to prioritize women in the trades;  we’re always supportive of that. We immediately wanted to learn more about her and give her  that opportunity for an interview”, said Sara Bogue, Vice President of Residential Operations at ReVision. After completing the interview process including a job shadow experience, ReVision hired Thomas as an installer apprentice.

As if finding an ideal employment opportunity isn’t enough, both Thomas and ReVision receive added benefits from NHEP’s OJT program to ensure their professional relationship is a success. OJT provides employers with reimbursement for costs associated with training new employees, including up to 50% wage reimbursement and possible tax credit. They also provide the employee with financial support for things like child care, gas and unplanned expenses.

Katrina Murray, Statewide Work Experience and OJT manager, worked with Thomas and contacted I Build NH’s Jennifer Landon to aid Thomas in finding this job. She knew that Landon could help. “Relationships are so, so important. You have trust that they will get back to you and you know you can rely on each other,” said Murray of her connection with I Build NH. Landon gave Thomas some industry leads and ideas for things to work on, helped refresh her resume and made her ‘a better candidate for the apprenticeship’,” said Murray.

“I Build NH connects industry with education and community agencies to address our  workforce challenges,” said Landon. “It’s stories like Alyssa’s where we see the success of  our efforts.”

Thomas couldn’t be happier on this new path. “I absolutely love what I do today,” she said. “And I just came up on a year clean with my recovery. I am making a life for me and my son and working towards a lifelong career as an electrician. The future looks brighter than it’s ever been.”